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Why Periscope is here to stay

Over recent months a couple of live video streaming apps have shot to stardom; Meerkat and Periscope. Initially a lot of the buzz was focused on Meerkat but, out of the blue, Twitter restricted the app’s access to its platform and announced it had bought rival, Periscope, so the shortest format-war in history was over before it had even begun.

Early reactions from the social media echo chamber have been mixed. With any new app that catches the digerati’s attention a certain amount of hype is always to be expected, but plenty of pundits have wondered aloud whether it’s just another flash in the pan. Are consumers really that interested in streaming live video?

I’m on the fence about how consumers will use Periscope, but I think the app has already won over the all-important business audience, and that’s why it’s here to stay.

The way businesses use video content has changed significantly over the past ten years. Cheaper video cameras and editing software have made production more accessible, and sites like YouTube and Vimeo have simplified online streaming. A lot of businesses have embraced this new capability with gusto, using video content for a wide range of marketing activity, as well as other functions such as customer service.

But live streaming video has remained problematic. The technology required to send out a video stream in real-time has been clunky and expensive for a long time and, critically, there’s been no easy way to ensure that you can get your video in front of the right audience.

Periscope solves both of those problems. Creating a live video stream requires only a mobile device and an internet connection, and the integration with Twitter means that reaching an audience of people who are interested in your business is easy. Whether they’re using a mobile device or desktop PC, they can instantly tune into your stream.

Who’s already using Periscope?

I recently spoke about Periscope with Kevin Reed, who edits trade publications Accountancy Age and Financial Director at Incisive Publications. He told me that while a lot of trade media like his would like to make better use of video, tight budgets and lack of in-house video skills makes it difficult. But recently he’s been experimenting with Periscope for a weekly live discussion from his office’s local pub. This informal Friday afternoon chat provides a nice way of recapping the week’s big news, and the video is captured and hosted on YouTube for future playback.

We’re also seeing mainstream consumer media adopting the platform. Absolute Radio’s Christian O’Connell has begun using Periscope to provide video streams of segments from his popular breakfast show. It’s these kind of endorsements that will help a wider consumer audience understand the value of the app – even if they don’t want to share video themselves, people will begin to see it as a channel for receiving good quality free content.

Outside of the media, businesses are already making use of Periscope. The British Museum recently set up a live video tour with historian, Dan Snow, presenting from its Greek art exhibit, and the BBC recently reported on an estate agent using the technology to provide remote property viewings.

In terms of big-brand adoption, it’s still early days, but we’ve already seen Heineken South Africa making use of Periscope as part of its EUFA Champions League sponsorship activity. The opportunities for both consumer and B2B marketing are practically limitless, with the ability to extend the value of all kinds of activity by adding in a low-cost live-video stream to reach a much wider audience.

As a digital specialist who’s been around the block a few times, I tend to be sceptical when people start trumpeting the next big thing in social media because most of the time, it isn’t. I think Periscope is different. There’s a real opportunity here for Twitter to significantly change the way people, and brands, use live video and, with tighter integration, to potentially transform the future of Twitter itself.

(Image credit: Steve Hanna)